Sensory Awareness in the World

Those who study and offer this work, know about its transformative impact from personal experience. After years of practice and offering Sensing to others,many leaders have been drawn to work with particular groups of people out of a compassionate desire to alleviate suffering.

Lee Klinger Lesser felt drawn to work with veterans when she saw the profound and long-lasting effects of war on soldiers: PTSD, high suicide rates, substance abuse, unemployment, isolation and multiple commitments to in-patient psych wards.

When Tony Osornio barely survived a skydiving accident, it took her years to recover enough to just sit up. Sensing helped her to gradually regain some basic motor skills. She works with others who are wheelchair bound through a program in Mexico: Fundación Humanista de Ayuda a Discapacitados FHADI (Humanitarian Foundation for Helping the Disabled).

Luzma Ramirez, PhD is an educator who saw the potential for healing communities by offering sensory awareness to students in elementary schools in areas of Mexico City where violence and poverty is high. Now the program she works for is in 15 schools and includes Sensory Awareness training for teachers and education majors at universities. When mothers and fathers saw the changes in their children, they wanted to know more. So Luzma started groups for mothers, and has plans for fathers. The results are tangible: a decrease in bullying and violence throughout the community.

Judyth Weaver, PhD has worked for many years with Tibetan nuns who escaped persecution in their homeland by the occupying Chinese army. With others, finding funds for shelter and support for these courageous women and offering Sensory Awareness to them. Already deeply compassionate, these selfless women found this work to be very compatible with their long years of meditation. They had never focused on themselves, but learned that this kind of ‘self-focus’ simultaneously carries a deepening of connection to others, and that self-care is essential if we are to be of service to others.

Stefan Laeng-Gilliatt and Eugene Tashima took this work into prison systems where they lived. The late Sofia Rosoff, a world class musician and teacher, found that Sensory Awareness could restore musicians who suffered from injuries related to how they were interacting with their instruments and helped them to more deeply connect to the music they were playing. Carol Buck, a fine cellist, also works with musicians to learn to play more naturally, with awareness, so that they avoid injury.

There are many more examples.